Dinkey Lakes Wilderness

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Click for Shaver Lake, California Forecast
Dinkey Creek

Suggested Flies for Dinkey Lakes area:
Western Sierra Hatch Selection

Other Local Favorites:

Stillwater Flies:
Woolly Bugger #8-10
Mohair Leech #8-10
Matuku #8-10

Dry Flies:
Parachute Adams #16-18
Olive Caddis #16-18
Yellow Humpy #14
Black Gnat
Chernobyl Ant
Mosquito

Nymph Flies:
Hare's Ear #16-18
Prince Nymph #16-18

Directions: There are numerous access routes to Dinky Lakes Wilderness. You can come in from the west on Kaiser Pass Road (Hwy 168) and take the 4WD Red/Coyote Jeep Road at Tamarack Creek. or from the north on the 4WD road out of Badger Flat campground near Kaiser Pass. From the southwest out of Fresno, take Highway 168 north for 45 miles to Shaver Lake. Turn East on Dinkey Creek Road and proceed 12 miles to community of Dinkey Creek. Tailhead is at end of road. You can also continue on Rock Creek Road, go six miles to intersection of Road 9S10 and go west for 4.7 miles to Road 9S62. Go 2.2 miles to reach the tailhead parking lot.This will get you within 3 miles of Dinky Lakes. From the southeast, you can access along Helms Creek from Courtright Reservoir.

Notes:
Dinkey Lakes Wilderness consists of 16 lakes and numerous streams with Rainbows and Brookies. A wilderness permit is required and can be picked up at the Ranger Station in Prather. The wilderness was established in 1984 of 30,000 acres. Most of the wilderness is above 8000 feet elevation. The centerpiece of the area is First Dinkey Lake at 9,150 feet elevation. First Dinkey Lake has Rainbows, Brookies, and Browns. As in all of the Dinkey Wilderness lakes and streams, the trout do not get large but they are plentiful. Brookies are planted by aerial drop into most of the lakes. Expect 8-11 inch classes.

You can reach First Dinkey Lake by the following Dinkey Creek. Dinkey Creek got it's name from a little dog owned by four hunters, Joe Medley, Marion Medley, Joe Folsom, and Al Yarborough. Dinkey had a fight with a grizzly bear at this creek in August, 1863. The dog was injured and the men called the place Dinkey. Dinkey Creek is a freestone creek with many small meadows changing the creek to a meadow stream at times. The creek is mostly known for Brookies but also has some resident Rainbows and Browns. A trail from Dinky Creek Campground will take you there. It is about 12 miles of trail from the trailhead with a 3000 foot gain. Another trail to the area is by way of Courtright Reservoir where the trail follows Helms Creek. The trail is about 9.5 miles to First Dinky Lake with a 800 foot gain. Helms Creek starts at Rock Lake and is a freestone creek with Brookies and Rainbows.
Other lakes include:
Second Dinkey Lake: (elevation: 9,650 feet), consists of Brookies.
Mystery Lake: (elevation: 8,850 feet), consists of Brookies.
Swede Lake: (elevation: 9,100 feet), consists of Rainbows.
South Lake: (elevation: 9,250 feet), consists of Brookies.
Island Lake: (elevation: 9,800 feet), consists of Goldens.
Rock Lake: (elevation: 9,600 feet), consists of Brookies.
Cliff Lake: (elevation: 9,400 feet), consists of Rainbows and Brookies.

From the trailhead at Tamarack Creek you can reach the following lakes:
West Lake: (elevation: 8,800 feet), consists of Brookies
Red Lake: (elevation: 9,000 feet), consists of Rainbows
Coyote Lake: (elevation: 9,000 feet), consists of Rainbows and Brookies
Beryl Lake: ( elevation: 8,790 feet), consists of Brookies
Tamarack Creek consists of Rainbows, Browns, and Brookies. It is also a freestone creek with a large meadow off it's southern fork, Tamarack Meadow

A 4 wd road from Dinkey Creek will take you easterly to a trailhead off of Laurel Creek. From there you can reach:
Swamp Lake: (elevation: 9,100 feet), consists of Rainbows and Brookies.

© 2013 Steve Schalla
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